The Rich and the Famous

Discussion in 'Acquistion Targets' started by zuolun, Nov 11, 2012.


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  1. Vemocogeowl

    Vemocogeowl Guest

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  2. zuolun

    zuolun Well-Known Member

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    Do you know Ho Yeow Sun was the girl next door?

    [video=youtube;EZ5tPqZDjyA]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=EZ5tPqZDjyA[/video]
     
  3. zuolun

    zuolun Well-Known Member

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    Main-Stream-Media Vs The Professional Social Media/Active Social Networking

    City Harvest leaders' trial begins on 15 May 2013

    We Stand By You https://www.facebook.com/citynewssg

    [video=youtube;cOToKFKGpdY]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cOToKFKGpdY[/video]

    Documents come under scrutiny in City Harvest Church trial

    By Claire Huang
    23 May 2013 10:49 PM

    On the sixth day of the trial involving six City Harvest Church leaders, several documents came under scrutiny. One document was the minutes of an investment committee meeting dated 29 July 2008.

    SINGAPORE: On the sixth day of the trial involving six City Harvest Church leaders, several documents came under scrutiny.

    One document was the minutes of an investment committee meeting dated 29 July 2008.

    The prosecution alleged it was backdated to cover up the misuse of the church's Building Fund.

    Church founder Kong Hee and four others - John Lam, Chew Eng Han, Tan Ye Peng and Serina Wee - allegedly misused S$24 million by channelling it into two companies, Xtron Productions and PT the First National Glassware (Firna), in what was described as "sham bond investments".

    This allegedly took place between January 2007 and October 2008.

    A second set of charges involves four of the six accused - Chew Eng Han, Tan Ye Peng, Serina Wee and Sharon Tan - who are said to have misappropriated some S$26 million to cover up the first sum.

    The funds were allegedly used to boost the music career of Kong's wife, Sun Ho.

    The prosecution alleged that Serina Wee, Tan Ye Peng, Chew Eng Han, John Lam and Sharon Tan conspired to cover up the misuse of the church's Building Fund. And the prosecution tried to prove this through a chain of emails sent on August 1 up to August 5 in 2008.

    On Thursday, it presented emails where the five discussed the agenda for an investment committee meeting to be held on 5 August 2008.

    Two points were to be raised - whether the church's investment complied with its policy, and Xtron's ability to redeem the bond.

    In questioning former Xtron director, Koh Siow Ngea, the prosecution pointed out that these same two points were listed in the minutes of an investment committee meeting on 29 July 2008.

    On Wednesday, the defence had sought to show through the July minutes that the committee members had seriously discussed the ability of Xtron to redeem bonds it had issued to the church. It also tried to make the point that the committee had met two banks before appointing accused Chew Eng Han's company, AMAC Capital Partners, as fund manager.

    The court also heard that Serina Wee had said in an email that the church could not record minutes about a S$10.7 million bank loan Xtron had taken. She wrote: "They are not supposed to be aware of this". Her email was sent only to Chew Eng Han, John Lam, Sharon Tan and Tan Ye Peng. This was unlike earlier emails that included investment committee members Nicholas Goh, Martin Ong and witness Mr Koh.

    The prosecution said the five conspired to backdate the minutes to July, so as to hide Xtron's bank loan and to placate Xtron's external auditors.

    The auditors had sent an email on 1 August 2008 stating they would only finalise Xtron's audit for 2007, when outstanding issues were resolved.

    These issues related to Xtron bonds and the use of the church's Building Fund for investments.

    Another document in question was a personal guarantee signed by Wahju Hanafi indemnifying Xtron against any losses from the Crossover Project.

    The Crossover Project aims to use pop music for evangelism and the music career of Sun Ho is part of it.

    The other document was another personal guarantee signed by Kong Hee, Tan Ye Peng, Chew Eng Han and Mr Koh. This other guarantee was meant to indemnify Mr Wahju for the earlier-mentioned personal guarantee.

    Referring to an email sent by Serina Wee to Chew Eng Han in 2010, the prosecution said drafts of the two personal guarantees were attached.

    The prosecution then asked Mr Koh if he recalled signing the guarantee in 2007. Mr Koh could not.

    Highlighting the three-year time gap, prosecutor Christopher Ong questioned why Serina Wee only drafted the documents in 2010. Mr Koh said he wasn't aware.

    This prompted Mr Ong to ask: "Does that look like an error to you?"

    Mr Koh replied there could have been an "oversight".

    After six days of hearing, the first tranche of the trial has wrapped up. It will resume in late August for a month and Channel NewsAsia understands that the other director of Xtron and the director of Firna are expected to take the stand then.

     
  4. zuolun

    zuolun Well-Known Member

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    Anyone who has the ability to consistently make billions of dollars in Singapore in the long run, must be someone with special talent.

    One Nation Under Lee (complete video)

    [video=youtube;17qhGIwyGj0]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=17qhGIwyGj0[/video]
     
  5. zuolun

    zuolun Well-Known Member

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    Let me tell you a story between a smart thief and a not-so-smart thief.

    Ah Lee and Ah Tan both got caught and went to jail for stealing a pig.

    The jail term for such petty theft is a standard 6 months imprisonment.

    They were put into the same prison cell and Ah Lee found out that...

    While he stole and sold a big fat pig for a hefty sum of 300 dollars...

    Ah Tan had committed the same crime and given the same jail term as him;

    But what he stole was just a tiny piglet which he sold it for only 20 dollars! ....Aiyoh...[​IMG]

    The moral of the story: "The risk-reward ratio is unattractive."

    Anyone who has the ability to consistently con Singaporeans millions of dollars in the long run, must be someone with special talent.

    Unhealthy Heterosexual Lifestyle: Pastor Ho Yeow Sun Makes Asian Sexy Good In The US.

    [​IMG]

    Singapore Law Professor Convicted of Sex-For-Grades Corruption

    By Andrea Tan
    May 28, 2013 12:58 PM GMT+0800

    National University of Singapore associate professor of law Tey Tsun Hang was convicted of six charges of obtaining favors including sex from a female student in return for giving her better grades.

    “It’s clear that the accused abused his position as a professor,” Chief District Judge Tan Siong Thye said in handing down his verdict at a Singapore subordinate court today. He described the student as naive and vulnerable.

    Tey, a former district judge, had said he was in a consensual relationship with the student. He argued in court that he was coerced by officers of Singapore’s Corrupt Practices Investigation Bureau into giving them statements confessing to corruptly seeking gifts including a Mont Blanc pen and sex from the student.

    The case is Prosecutor v. Tey Hsun Hang. DAC027011/2012. The Subordinate Courts of Singapore.
     
  6. zuolun

    zuolun Well-Known Member

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    US scientist Shane Todd’s family walks out of Singapore inquest

    21 May, 2013

    The family of a US scientist found hanged in Singapore last year walked out of a coroner’s inquiry into their son’s death on Tuesday, saying they had “lost faith” in the proceedings.

    The move came after their star witness, a US pathologist who never examined the body, came under intense questioning for saying Shane Todd may have been killed by assassins after quitting a high-tech project for two Asian firms.

    Singapore authorities believe he committed suicide.

    “The prosecution brings forth witnesses at the last minute and we have no chance to question it. Basically we actually have lost faith in the process,” the late researcher’s father Rick Todd told reporters outside a courthouse.

    “We were told from the beginning that this will be honest and open. We were just chastised this morning for bringing forth evidence,” he said, referring to an email the family’s lawyers had introduced.

    The family stood up and left the court after learning that a Frenchman who knew Todd, Luis Alejandro Andro Montes, was going to testify that the American was still alive the day before his body was found on June 24, last year.

    Earlier on Tuesday Edward Adelstein, 75, a deputy medical examiner in Missouri engaged by the family, had testified that Todd was murdered in his Singapore apartment and his death made to look like a suicide as part of a conspiracy.

    Adelstein, testifying by live video link from the United States, admitted his conclusions were based only on pictures of the body and second-hand information.

    Todd’s parents say their son was killed because of his work for a Singapore electronics research institute with alleged links to a Chinese firm accused of involvement in espionage.

    Singapore’s state-linked Institute of Microelectronics (IME) and China’s Huawei Technologies have denied working on a project involving Todd, but confirmed they held preliminary talks on a potential research venture.

    Adelstein said Shane Todd was “a very dangerous person” to the two Asian companies, and asserted without offering any evidence that “they had him killed” and well-trained assassins may have been involved.

    Two other US medical examiners acting as independent experts support the suicide findings and were set to testify at the inquest, which was scheduled to end on May 28. A verdict is expected by late June and will only address the cause of death.

    A US congressional committee last year labelled Huawei and ZTE, another Chinese telecom firm, as potential security threats that should be excluded from US government contracts and barred from acquiring US firms.

    Medical examiner Adelstein, under questioning during the live video link, said Todd could have been disabled with a taser – an electronic device designed to stun – and killed with an arm lock before being hanged.

    District Judge Chay Yuen Fatt, who is overseeing the inquest, chided Adelstein for speculating and reminded him he was being asked to present forensic evidence.

    In an October last year report Adelstein had said that Todd, a well-built 31-year-old, was killed by “garroting” but on Tuesday the doctor said he was speculating at the time.

    Todd was part of an IME research team working on gallium nitride, a semiconductor that can be used in radar and satellite communications.

    Adelstein said photographs of Todd’s remains at his US funeral showed knuckle injuries and a forehead bruise that could have resulted from a fight.

    Singapore police investigators earlier testified that there were no signs of a struggle in the apartment where Todd’s body was found hanging from the top of a locked bathroom door by his girlfriend.

    A Singaporean psychiatrist told the inquiry that Todd was prescribed anti-depressants three months before his death in June last year.

    Former colleagues of the researcher have rejected the Todd family’s claim that he worked on a secret project that could harm US security.

    Todd’s parents said in media interviews that he expressed fears for his life before resigning from the Singapore institute and had been looking forward to returning to the United States.
     
  7. zuolun

    zuolun Well-Known Member

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  8. zuolun

    zuolun Well-Known Member

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    Montana family disputes Singapore police probe into son's death

    [video=youtube;nQns74WnP8Q]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nQns74WnP8Q[/video]

    US expert says scientist was murdered in Singapore

    21 May 2013

    An American scientist found hanged in Singapore last year was murdered and his death made to look like a suicide as part of a conspiracy, a US pathologist told an inquiry in the city-state Tuesday.

    Edward Adelstein, 75, a deputy medical examiner in Missouri, contradicted Singapore police findings that Shane Todd killed himself, but admitted his conclusions were based on pictures of the body and circumstantial information.

    Todd's parents, who also plan to testify, say their son was killed in June 2012 because of his work for a Singapore electronics research institute with alleged links to a Chinese firm accused of involvement in espionage.

    "The cause of death of Dr. Todd was strangulation by a ligature around his neck," Adelstein said in a written statement admitted as evidence Tuesday at a the inquiry, adding that "I would rule his death a murder -- a homicide."

    He said Todd was "a very dangerous person" to the two Asian companies, and asserted without offering any evidence that "they had him killed" and well-trained "assassins" may have been involved.

    Adelstein was engaged by the Todd family. Two other US medical examiners acting as independent experts support the suicide findings and will be asked to testify at the two-week inquest, Singapore officials say.

    A verdict is expected by late June and will only address the cause of death.

    Under questioning during a live video link from the United States, Adelstein said Todd could have been disabled with a taser -- an electronic device designed to stun -- and killed with an arm lock before being hanged.

    In an October 2012 report, Adelstein had said that Todd, a well-built 31-year-old, was killed by "garroting" but on Tuesday the doctor said he was speculating at the time.

    Todd's former employer, the Institute of Microelectronics (IME), and China's Huawei Technologies have denied working on a project involving Todd but confirmed they held preliminary talks on a potential research venture.

    A US congressional committee last year labelled Huawei and ZTE, another Chinese telecom firm, as potential security threats that should be excluded from US government contracts and barred from acquiring US firms.

    Todd was part of an IME research team working on gallium nitride, a semiconductor that can be used in radar and satellite communications.
     
  9. zuolun

    zuolun Well-Known Member

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    You Stupid - Sun (preview)

    [video=youtube;tbZoo3Sh5QY]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tbZoo3Sh5QY[/video]

    Gyrating For Jesus: A pow-ka-leow guide to Sun Ho’s greatest “hits”

    Singapore church on trial in pop star scandal

    By HEATHER TAN | Associated Press – Wed, May 15, 2013 4:13 AM EDT

    SINGAPORE (AP) — Singapore opened a long-anticipated corruption trial Wednesday of six church leaders accused of embezzling more than $40 million to fund the pop music career of the wife of their evangelical movement's founder.

    City Harvest Church faithful queued at a Singapore court overnight and packed the public gallery to show support for the accused who prosecutors say diverted the congregation's funds into "sham" investments to advance the career of aspiring star Ho Yeow Sun, popularly known as Sun Ho.

    The church with affiliates in neighboring Malaysia and other countries is one of Singapore's richest and biggest, with membership of more than 30,000. It is known in the region for staging large-scale, elaborate services resembling pop concerts which are conducted by Ho's husband, Kong Hee.

    Ho is not on trial but turned up in court Wednesday dressed in a black leather jacket, skinny pants, stiletto boots and sporting streaky blonde hair and grey contact lenses. Her husband chatted confidently with his lawyers. Kong is charged with conspiracy to commit criminal breach of trust.

    Also charged are church pastor Tan Ye Peng, church members Chew Eng Han and Lam Leng Hung, and accountants Serina Wee Gek Yin and Sharon Tan Shao Yuen. The six, who have yet to say how they will plea, could face prison terms ranging from 10 to 20 years.

    The prosecution's opening statement ridiculed the contention of church leaders that pop music was a tool of evangelism that would help spread God's message. It said Ho recorded and launched secular music albums to influence people "who would never choose to step foot into a church to listen to a preacher."

    Investments by the church in two companies, Xtron Productions and Firna, were in substance fake transactions that were orchestrated by the accused who were all involved in the planning and financing of Ho's music career, according to prosecutors.

    State media reported that 24 million Singapore dollars ($19 million) was channeled through Xtron and Firna and another S$26 million was misappropriated to cover up the initial sum.

    Prosecutors allege that the falsification of church accounts occurred in 2009.

    Singapore's media have painted Ho, who is in her early 40s, as an aspiring superstar who hoped for international fame to help spread her church's influence. She collaborated on a song and raunchy music video `China Wine' with rapper Wyclef Jean in 2007 and attended the 46th annual Grammy Awards ceremony in 2004. But accusations of impropriety and public disdain have since rained down on Ho, her ambitions and the church.

    Ho was reinstated as executive director of City Harvest Church on Monday by the Commissioner of Charities after a review found she had not contributed to mismanagement of the church.

    A former church accountant testified Wednesday how she had been instructed to take care of Xtron's accounts because it didn't have its own accounting department.
     
  10. zuolun

    zuolun Well-Known Member

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  11. zuolun

    zuolun Well-Known Member

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    Li Huabo, Corrupt Chinese Bureaucrat or Fall Guy?

    By Shai Oster and Andrea Tan
    March 28, 2013

    On a typically humid Singapore afternoon, Li Huabo leads visitors through the gates of his luxury condo complex—past the swimming pool, Jacuzzi, and reflexology center—to his three-bedroom apartment. He puts a stack of files on the dark marble dining room table while his wife gets juice from the kitchen, which looks out on a nature preserve. Li, 51, is stocky, with a boyish face framed by dark wire-rimmed glasses and black hair. He’s as ordinary as a man could be. You’d never know he’s facing charges related to alleged crimes in his native China, where Li claims he could have received the death penalty.

    For nearly 30 years, Li worked as a low-level government accountant in a poor county next to Lake Poyang in southeastern China’s Jiangxi province. He supplemented his meager functionary’s salary by running businesses on the side—a practice that’s officially prohibited but nonetheless commonplace among Chinese officials, many of whom have used their connections to amass huge fortunes in the private sector. Two years ago, Li quit his job stamping checks, sold his share of an oil refinery, unloaded his pink five-story villa, and moved his money and family out of China. Like other newly rich bureaucrats, he’d yearned to move somewhere safe, he says, where he wouldn’t have to worry about Communist Party crackdowns, health-care scares, or pollution.

    As he recounts his story, Li pauses to fetch a heavy gold Rolex—one of the last tokens of success he owns. In March 2011, one month after arriving in Singapore, he was arrested and accused of being the ringleader of an elaborate scheme to embezzle more than 90 million yuan ($14.5 million) from the Chinese government and funnel part of the money through Singaporean banks. Singapore police acted after a tip-off from Li’s remittance agent and a request from Beijing via Interpol. Although the two countries don’t have an extradition treaty, they share an interest in stemming the flow of dirty Chinese money into the island nation. Li claims interrogators told him that if he cooperated, they’d try to help. If he didn’t, he could face a far worse fate back home.

    Li refused and now faces up to 15 years in prison if convicted on three counts of banking stolen funds totaling S$182,770 ($146,771). A Singapore judge is expected to hand down a verdict on April 5. These days, Li spends most of his time sitting at home, living off the monthly check of S$4,000 the Singapore government has sent him since early 2011, when it froze all his bank accounts and property. His former co-workers framed him, he repeats like a mantra. “They want to hurt me,” he says.

    There’s no shortage of numbers about corruption in China. How reliable these numbers are is another matter. Last year prosecutors investigated 47,338 cases of official misconduct, 5 percent more than the previous year, and recovered 8.8 billion yuan. Despite strict currency controls, money is still getting out of China. Since the 1990s around 18,000 officials and state employees have left with some 800 billion yuan, according to a central bank report leaked online in 2011. Global Financial Integrity, a Washington-based anti-money-laundering watchdog group, estimates that $3.79 trillion in illicit funds flowed out of China from 2000 to 2011.

    While the wealth and misbehavior of senior Communist Party officials and their families have received international attention, the more insidious forms of official corruption take place at the local level. Tales of corruption have become the stuff of popular roman à clef novels such as The Diary of Government Official Hou Weidong, written by a midlevel sanitation official, which describes a culture of endemic graft. Rarely, however, do outsiders hear directly from bureaucrats caught up in corruption cases. Li told his story to Bloomberg Businessweek during a four-hour interview at his home in Singapore. He maintains he’s innocent of the charges against him—a fall guy, not a crook. His story provides a glimpse of the pervasiveness of influence peddling at all levels of China’s bureaucracy and shows how difficult it is to stop abuses that have become an accepted part of doing business.

    Poyang is one of China’s poorest counties. It’s named after what was the country’s largest freshwater lake, before drought and dams shrunk the lake from 4,000 square kilometers to just 200. Government jobs are coveted in a place like Poyang. Last year a record 1.5 million candidates nationwide applied online for 20,000 civil service jobs, state-run news agency Xinhua reported.
     
  12. zuolun

    zuolun Well-Known Member

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    That was how my close friend Ka Ka HOOT at Wilmar using CFD.

    He longed 500 lots Wilmar @ 3.30/sh = S$165,000 (max. financing for Wilmar @ 90%)
    He sold 500 lots Wilmar @ 3.50/sh, profit @ 0.20/sh = S$100,000 (excluding commission)

    [​IMG]

    Super Rich The Greed Game

    [video=youtube;suZb9Z0b05I]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=suZb9Z0b05I[/video]

     
  13. zuolun

    zuolun Well-Known Member

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  14. zuolun

    zuolun Well-Known Member

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    Super Rich The Greed Game

    [video=youtube;suZb9Z0b05I]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=suZb9Z0b05I[/video]
     
  15. zuolun

    zuolun Well-Known Member

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    Singapore's 11 top billionaires

    By Krisana Gallezo
    12 Mar 2013

    Guess who's Singapore's richest with US$6bn net worth.

    According to data obtained from Hurun's Global Rich list, brothers Robert and Philip NG of the Far East Group top the list.

    They are followed by Wee Cho Yaw, the current Chairman of the United Overseas Bank (UOB); Sukanto Tanoto, an Indonesian magnate who relocated to Singapore in the 1990s and Richard Chandler, a New Zealand born entrepreneur who is based in Singapore.

    Altogether, the 11 Singapore-based billionaires have total wealth of $28.7 billion.

    By country, the US was home to 409 billionaires, comfortably ahead of the 317 from China. Between the US and China, they now have half of all billionaires on the planet.

    Moscow is the billionaire capital of the world, home to 76 billionaires, edging out New York which has 70. London came in at fifth place behind HK and Beijing. Five of the Top Ten cities for billionaires are in Greater China.

    [​IMG]
     
  16. zuolun

    zuolun Well-Known Member

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    [URL="http://tv.cntv.cn/video/C11287/b209292c0f144b72476555a5083419a5”]隐形富豪钟声坚 — 仁恒置地集团董事局主席兼总裁[/URL]

    Zhong Sheng Jian on Singapore

    [video=youtube;dB3egUAPOIM]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dB3egUAPOIM[/video]
     
  17. zuolun

    zuolun Well-Known Member

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    Malaysian Chinese success story

    [video=youtube;7MdePiLBUFc]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7MdePiLBUFc[/video]
     
  18. zuolun

    zuolun Well-Known Member

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  19. zuolun

    zuolun Well-Known Member

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    Wealth Over the Edge: Singapore

    $26,000 cocktails. Traffic jams freckled with Ferraris. The world's sternest city is now the richest. Why?

    By SHIBANI MAHTANI
    March 7, 2013, 10:07 a.m. ET

    It's midnight on a Saturday night at the Marina Bay Sands resort near the sparkling Singapore River, and all the boutiques are shut. But past a cosmetic-surgery clinic and a Ferrari accessories store close by, a large crowd is getting increasingly agitated. Dozens of hopefuls are clamoring to get in to what is billed as the world's most expensive club, Pangaea.

    Tight-fitting Herve Leger bandage dresses are practically a uniform here, often paired with Christian Louboutin heels and Chanel 2.55 bags, as women try to befriend club goers who are lucky enough to get past the red-velvet barrier and bouncers. It is frequently the leggy models, part of the club's core demographic, who succeed. Out-of-town visitors who negotiated their way onto the guest list weeks earlier are turned away, even after offering to pay more than $3,000 for a table. The nightclub is completely full.

    Past the bouncers, a walk through a long tunnel with blue ultraviolet lights and a ride up an elevator reveal one of the world's most exclusive parties. Michael Ault, Pangaea's founder, sits at the club's most prestigious table by the bar, on cushions covered in exotic African ostrich skins. His table is covered with bottles of Belvedere vodka, Cristal champagne, buckets of ice and dozens of glasses for his friends. His wife, Sabrina Ault, a former fashion model and now his business partner, wears a fake shark's head and wields a plastic gun while dancing on a table top. At Pangaea, all surfaces are made for dancing—even tables made from the trunks of 1,000-year-old trees and the crocodile-skinned couches.

    It may seem counterintuitive, but a dance club does not need a dance floor if you are Michael Ault. A veteran of Manhattan nightlife and descendant of blue-blooded socialites—he is the son of a Van Cleef from the Van Cleef & Arpels jewelry family and the stepson of Wall Street's famed Dean Witter—Ault, 49, prides himself on one thing above all others: the ability to throw a good party. And he has done just that over the years at more than 25 clubs from New York to Miami Beach and São Paulo to London. He is credited with being one of the first nightclub impresarios to introduce bottle service—now commonplace globally—at the legendary New York Spy Bar in the 1990s, where even Kate Moss was turned away on exceptionally packed nights.

    The Pangaea experience, he says, replicates the feeling of being at a house party—one that just happens to offer African tribal masks from Ault's personal collection, throbbing music, a $26,000 cocktail that contains a diamond inside and is served by waitresses in black dresses, and the knowledge that many of the people around you are worth billions.

    Pangaea, though just over a year old, is now considered the most profitable club in the world with revenues of more than $100,000 per night in recent months, Ault says. It's also one of the most expensive clubs, with tables costing as much as $15,000, and the uber-rich regularly chalking up six-figure bills. He could have brought this extravagance to just about anywhere in the world. London, with its collection of royals and a party scene that attracts Europe's glitterati. Dubai, too, the land of if-you-want-an-island-you-just-build-one. And of course, his hometown and former playground, Manhattan.

    But Ault, who moved to Singapore three years ago, says he "no longer feels the magic" in Gotham, which still bears the scars of a financial crisis that knocked the wind out of much of its most extravagant party culture. Singapore, he says, is another matter. This is where he says the rich feel, well, rich, and unusually secure. And where they seem to know only one common language, the language of excess—all too shamelessly displayed in his club.

    "One night, there were these kids here—literally kids in their 20s—who all had their own private jets," Ault recalls during another meeting, on a Thursday morning, leaning back on a leather couch in his club wearing bright-blue fuzzy slippers embroidered with a pink skull. "Serious jets, too. There was an A380 which was converted to include a pool and basketball court—it was ridiculous."

    "What I see here is what I imagined must have happened in the U.S. in the 1880s, in the Gilded Age, when it first took over England in terms of wealth," he says. "It is truly shocking how much wealth there is—and how willing people are to spend it."

    Welcome to the world's newest Monaco, a haven for the ultra-rich in what until recently was mocked as one of the most straight-laced, boring cities in the world. When most people think of Singapore, if they do at all, they think of an order-obsessed Asian version of Wall Street or London's Canary Wharf, only with implausibly clean, sterile streets and no crime. The southeast Asian city-state of five million people is perhaps best known for banning the sale of chewing gum or caning vandals, including American Michael Fay in 1994 for spray-painting cars. Drug traffickers face the death penalty, and even Ault complains the authorities won't let him import his prized gun collection, which now sits in his other homes in Palm Beach and Manhattan.

    But over the past decade, Singapore has undergone a dramatic makeover, as the rich and famous from Asia and beyond debark on its shores in search of a glamorous new home—and one of the safest places to park their wealth. Facebook FB +4.10% co-founder Eduardo Saverin gave up his American citizenship in favor of permanent residence there, choosing to live on and invest from the island while squiring around town in a Bentley. Australian mining tycoon Nathan Tinkler, that country's second wealthiest man under 40, whose fortune is pegged at $825 million by Forbes, also chose to move to Singapore last year. They join Bhupendra Kumar Modi, one of India's biggest telecom tycoons who gained Singapore citizenship in 2011, as well as New Zealand billionaire Richard Chandler, who relocated in 2008, and famed U.S. investor Jim Rogers, who set up shop there in 2007. Gina Rinehart, one of the world's richest women, slapped down $46.3 million for a pair of Singapore condominium units last year.

    And then there are, of course, your average millionaires—more of whom can be found among Singapore's resident population than anywhere in the world. According to Boston Consulting Group, the island had 188,000 millionaire households in 2011—slightly more than 17 percent of its resident households—which effectively means one in six homes has disposable private wealth of at least $1 million, excluding property, business and luxury goods. Add in property, with Singapore real estate among the most expensive in the world, and this number would be even higher. Singapore also now has the highest gross domestic product per capita in the world at $56,532, having overtaken Norway, the U.S., Hong Kong and Switzerland, according to a 2012 wealth report by Knight Frank and C
    iti Private Bank.

    “But what really checks all the right boxes for many of the world's ultra-rich is Singapore's obsession with order.”

    The toys of all these millionaires and billionaires are visible across the city-state. A country roughly the size of San Francisco, it now has 449 Ferraris, up from 142 in 2001, while its Maserati fleet has grown from 24 to 469. Yacht clubs are popping up along with super-luxurious shops, like the Louis Vuitton Island Maison, a flagship boutique of the ubiquitous luxury brand housed in its own floating pavilion. Nightclubs like Pangaea and Filter, which are frequented by the young Saverin and his crew of millionaire party boys, have turned into havens for the wealthy to mingle. Rich out-of-towners play at Singapore's two glamorous new casino resorts, opened in 2010, including the Marina Bay Sands complex with its celebrity chef restaurants and an infinity pool on the 57th floor with palm trees overlooking the skyline. In 2007, Bernie Ecclestone decided that the city-state would be added to the illustrious Formula One World Championship calendar. The race—which is the only Formula One night race in the world and is set to continue annually until at least 2017—has emerged as one of the most glamorous Formula One events, broadcasting the impressive Singapore night skyline to millions globally.

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    Last edited: Mar 8, 2013
  20. zuolun

    zuolun Well-Known Member

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    [video=youtube;LkRDFJTUMgg]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LkRDFJTUMgg[/video]

    Humility at Its Best : Robert Kuok

    Mar 10, 2012

    At times you wondered what doing good can do for you. For all you know is that if you are being kind to people, they will take advantage and eat you up. It doesn't pay to be good to others.

    But, here is a real life testimony that says doing good yield good results. Robert Kouk, the richest man from Malaysia with assets worth more than USD10b tells it all in this live interview in China. Robert age 87 years old rarely gives an interview.

    This is the first time I have seen him detailing his secrets of his success. Though this video clip is in Mandarin which I can only understand about 10%, but his message is clear and loud. One need to follow the right path of wholesome thoughts and actions all the time. He did not compromised on this.

    I've written about him several times and I have already know that he draws his inspiration and value from his mother. But to see him talking about it in a dialogue is awesome. Humility was one of his strongest point to success.

    Pls enjoy the video here. Word of caution, it's 56mins long without sub-title. If you do not understand Mandarin, you may want to get someone who can interpret for you

    Bugs Tan
    Malaysia
     
    Last edited: Feb 24, 2013
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